My Career Is Stagnant At The Moment…

(Taken late last month.)

There’s not much I can do about it. What I can do is take stock of where I’m at now:

•SAG eligible

•A decent theatre resume

•A film credit

•Nominated for a regional award

That’s what I have for the time being, though I managed to get this done at a rapid pace of 3 years (SAG alone takes some people a decade.)

Right now, the only thing I have going on is my YouTube channel until I work another film in 2019. I’ll try to keep this page updated on any industry related things that may come up in the meantime.

Big Things In The Works!!!

(Taken Monday after my epiphany.)

While I was rambling on one of my Instagram stories (saved in the highlights) about one of the films we showed at work: I thought about vlogging film and television reviews. A friend of mine suggested I use a separate platform as to not disrupt my current social media brand. Well that sparked something.

Currently I have an active YouTube channel that I use specifically for self-tape auditions. Since those links are usually private, I don’t have other content posted for the public to view. Until now.

Posting reviews is hardly anything new and there is plenty of competition out there for me. However, I just want a platform to air my grievances at other people over what I should actually be doing myself…work in the film industry. That is the premise. You are going to watch an actress who is also trained in the technical side of film, bitch and complain about why the production was bad, while also praising what’s good about it.

Don’t expect it to be comedic. Comedy is a precious skill afforded to few and its not my forte. My biggest hope is that it’s relatable and informative. Just like my blog.

I’m excited aren’t you?

The Follow Up and Film News

(Taken this past Friday evening. This was my audition number.)

As of right now it’s not looking likely that I was picked for the project with the industry leader. That’s ok, because I’m grateful for the fact that I got this far and met her. I will continue to apply as long as she is putting out casting notices and she highly encourages it.

In other good news, it looks like I’m going to film another project with the same director who gave me my first speaking part (yay another role and reel footage!)

(Source: Facebook.)

The synopsis of this film is a gentleman who travels from his home in Boston to work in Côte d’Ivoire. I would be playing the lead’s girlfriend. The part currently is limited, but they asked for my input on how I would play it. They got straight away to re-writing it.

(Source: Prinze Whyee. A still shot from MUDA, currently in distribution in Africa.)

Re-writing a part is nothing new, the director did it the first time when I had to step in on ‘MUDA’ as the last lead’s little sister. I think it’s awesome that he is able to do that for me and immediately thought of me for this new film.

I’m excited to embark on something new!

Some Good Things

(Taken yesterday before my casting call.)

As I stated in the post previous to this one, I was a little nervous about what the day would bring for me on Friday. It turned out well.

First, there was some confusion about my shift in the morning. Even though I offered to cover a person’s serving shift and they said ok, apparently they asked someone else too and didn’t bother to tell me. I would have been annoyed if it wasn’t for the fact that I had something to do immediately after that shift. I could have cared less. I just wanted to go home and prepare.

Having a sudden breather helped big time. Yes, I have done plenty of runway auditions, but still I was dead set on impressing this person because I want to work with them in any capacity. Taking that time allowed me to soothe my nerves.

Later on at the audition, it was a good group of people. The models, the casting crew, they had a good energy and it didn’t feel competitive or chaotic. I did my walk and afterwards we got to take pictures with the leader herself (which is featured on my Instagram take a look!)

I’m hoping for the best outcome, whether it’s to work on the project as a model or as crew. Fingers crossed 🤞🏽

Let’s All Take a Moment of Silence…

(Source: Facebook.)

Tomorrow is the big day. My audition with the industry professional. Before that, I have to work. Tomorrow will be my first official serving shift at this job. There are issues however.

We have a new POS system that I’m not familiar with.

Friday lunches are usually very busy.

Plus my nerves will be racked the entire time thinking about my audition.

Pray for me that I survive the day.

Second Chance

(Source: Sailor Moon, Toei Animation. Creator Naoko Takeuchi.)

Remember two weeks ago when I submitted my information to a high level mover and shaker in the industry? That gig they advertised has come and gone with me not working on it, but they advertised another casting call scheduled for this week.

As always, I strike while the iron is hot with this strike leading to some success! I got a call back for a live audition.

This gig may also not be for me, however, I will definitely be on their radar for any future project.

The other rumor about this individual…they may be able to represent talent. Ultimately that is my goal: to get representation, bigger parts, and more work. Wish me luck!

Sound

(Source: whatspopping-sugar Tumblr and Pinterest.)

In 2015, I attended my first screening party as an actress. I was there due to appearing as a featured extra in a small independent project. While there, I overheard one of the other guests in attendance, answering a question asked of him:

What makes a good film?

Interestingly enough, his answer had nothing to do with the script, the actors, or the direction. His answer was purely technical….

“The film has to have good sound. If the sound is bad, it ruins the entire film.”

Sound advice if you ask me (pardon the pun.)

Having previously studied film and television production, along with currently working at an art house movie theatre, sound really can make or break the film!

I’m in a constant battle with the volume knob of the sound board every time I’m working as a projectionist. A couple of issues that I have with the films are, 1) too loud music but too low speaking volume. Or 2) too low/too loud altogether.

The second one seems simple enough. Just turn the volume up or down. It’s a little trickier than that. Too low volume is a combination of both low music and mumble acting (actors who speak with poor enunciation. It drives me up a wall.) If the volume is too high, the sound has a weird blown out effect to it, which also makes it hard to hear the actors even when the volume is at a reasonable level.

How can a filmmaker combat this?

Part of me suspects that low speaking volume, but high music volume, may be to mask a shit story. In which case the filmmakers are just going to have to own it and make the sound level across the the board. Special effects sounds should be louder, but only by a few decibels (we are not trying to destroy our patrons’ ear drums.) And please tell the actors to stop mumbling!

I Didn’t Get It

(Source: Facebook. I think that is the artist’s watermark on the bottom of the card but reverse searches yielded no results. Instead I’m just sharing where I found it.)

I didn’t land the gig that was shooting today. Which means I work at my day job today… yay.

I’m bummed, but not hurt. In this industry you have to be prepared for a lot of rejection and very limited success. Still, I’m grateful for getting an initial response.

I’m on this person’s radar now.

THIS wasn’t the project for me, but maybe a future one will be. We shall see.

Another Work Day and Maybe Some Good News

(Source: @witsandsass IG)

I’m seriously dragging today on my way to work. While this place is honoring my schedule and paying me, there are still problems. One, I’m paying too much money to get there as opposed to the job I truly wanted which was down the street from my house. Two, I’m still seeing some of the weirdness from this job.

(Source: Facebook.)

To top it off, it isn’t over yet. I have one more shift tomorrow, that is if I make it until then. Nothing bad though. Just an opportunity that may force me to take a leap of faith. That leap would be well worth me losing my job. Especially since my patience for nonsense is extremely limited.

(Source: someecards.com and On Stage Blog. I enjoy working in the shadows lol!)

I got a response for a project that would be filming tomorrow at the same time I’m supposed to work. There’s no confirmation if I am going to be working on this project in any fashion. So far I had to submit more information, my résumé, photos, social media handle, and my location.

What I’m hoping for is to work on the project regardless of whether I’m acting (which is what I originally submitted for) or crew (which I added I could do too.) The reason why this is such a big deal: the person who is coordinating the project is attached to a major super star right now, working in the depths of the industry.

Much like my time at Tribeca Film Festival, this is an opportunity to build my résumé and make connections. I have to prove myself worthy for this gig and I hope that they are willing to work with me.

Borg vs. McEnroe

(Source: Teaser Trailer.com and Pinterest.)

This film just completed its run at my job and I wanted to unpack my thoughts about it. Not the quality of the film, which in fact was very good, but the process that went into making it.

The reason is, there are so many locations used, crowd scenes, costuming, historical accuracy respected, camera angles, stunt doubles, and shoot days.

Let’s start with locations. According to Wikipedia, this film was shot over at least 5 locations: Gothenburg, Sweden; Södertälje, Sweden; Prague, Czech Republic; London, United Kingdom; and the country of Monaco. The stadium used to mimic the Centre Court arena was in Prague and not the actual arena in Wimbledon* if you can believe that.

Crowd scenes. Oh boy do I know about quite a bit about this. Working crowd scenes, seems to be what I do mostly on my background shoots. Whether I’m at a party or a courtroom, chances are I, and a number of other background actors are being herded to set by Production Assistants. For this type of crowd scene though, they needed hundreds. With enough costuming to cheat the shot and make it look like thousands were in attendance. I could only imagine the casting notice for a shoot like this:

Seeking Men and Women, ages 18-99 for early 1980s Upscale Spectators in an outdoor sporting event. Must have multiple Summer looks to choose from and period appropriate hairstyles.

I didn’t include a pay rate because I don’t know how much they paid their actors, but that would usually be a part of the casting call too.

Costuming for the late 1970s, early 80s would be a pain. Not only does the background have to be in time appropriate clothes, but the principals as well. Many of the actors, I could tell, grew out their hair to match the look of the era. Though some of them had wigs on that looked mighty questionable.**

The costuming wasn’t the only thing that had to be respected historically, but much of the play too! The stunt doubles that actually played tennis match are great at what they do, because it definitely looked like they matched key moments of play.

The camera work and later editing, is what made this film. I’m sure this was multiple shoot days as it usually takes about a 12 hour day to film 5 minutes worth of footage at different angles. Plus the days had to be sunny. This doesn’t include the hard work the lighting crew has to put in to assist with making the lighting look consistent throughout the entire tennis match.

By far one of the more impressive films I have seen composed on the independent circuit.

*I kept wanting to spell Wilmington, which is where I live lol.

**I have a different word other than “questionable”, but I’m trying to be polite.